Blowing Rocks Preserve

The first time I saw a picture of Blowing Rocks Preserve I knew I had to plan a trip to visit. I honestly could not believe this was in Florida and I knew I had to see it for myself. Have you ever been before? Below is all the information you need to know before you plan your visit!

A rock structure on the beach at blowing rocks preserve

Blowing Rocks Preserve – The Basics

Blowing Rocks Preserve is 73-acres of protected land and is located on Jupiter Island. It is a must see if you are near Jupiter, Florida. The shoreline is made up of the largest collection of Anastasia limestone rocks on the east coast of Florida.  

  • Address: 574 S Beach Road, Hobe Sound, Florida 33455
  • Driving distance from select Florida cities:
    • Miami: 1 hour 30 minutes
    • Orlando: 2 hours 30 minutes
    • Tampa: 3 hours 30 minutes
    • Jacksonville: 4 hours
  • Hours: 9 AM to 4:30 PM, open daily
  • Entrance Fee: $2 per person
    • When I recently visited in January 2021 the fee was waived, but donations were accepted
  • Activities: Beach access, hiking, swimming, snorkeling
    • No lifeguards on duty, swim at your own risk
  • Other Notes: No pets, food, or alcohol are allowed
    • Reusable water bottles should be utilized to bring water
The Blowing Rocks Preserve entrance sign next to several trees and a paved sidewalk

 Tips for visiting Blowing Rocks Preserve

Parking

There are two parking lots on either side of the street next to Blowing Rocks Preserve. These fill up quickly, but we were able to snag a spot by arriving right at 9 AM. An additional option for parking is at Coral Cove Park but be prepared for about a 1-mile walk to Blowing Rocks Preserve.

Rocks and the ocean with a wave crashing in the distance at Blowing Rocks Preserve

Check the tide schedule before you visit

Timing your visit based on the tide schedule is important depending on what you want to see. If you have a chance, I suggest visiting two separate times so you can experience Blowing Rocks Preserve at low and high tide.

High Tide: If you want to see the waves crashing into the rocks you want to time your visit as close to high tide as you can. When the sea is rough, and it is high tide, the waves crash into the rocks and can be as high as 50 feet in the air if the conditions are exactly right.

Low Tide: If you want to see as much of the rocky limestone and sea caves you want to time your visit around low tide when the water is further out and calmer.

During my recent visit high tide occurred when the area was closed, but we arrived at 9 AM when it opened about 2 hours after high tide. You can check the tide schedule before your visit here.

Waves crashing into the rocks at Blowing Rocks Preserve

Wear the right footwear

When exploring Blowing Rocks Preserve you will be walking on the sand along the beach as well as on the trails, so you want to consider the type of shoes you wear. I recommend water sandals if you have them, or some other type of shoe you do not mind getting sandy. If you are looking for a new pair of water sandals, I love these Teva sandals.

Dark tan sand and deep blue ocean at Blowing Rock Preserve

Nature Trails at Blowing Rocks Preserve

There are several short nature trails to explore. Due to the short length of each trail, they can all easily be walked in one visit.  

  • Sea Grape Path: 125 yards
  • Dune Trail: 0.4-mile (one-way)
  • Maggy’s Path and Lagoon Trail: 0.4-mile loop
  • Lagoon Boardwalk: 150 yards
Sand trail framed by plants and palm trees

Sea Grape Path

The Sea Grape Path is the trail you will want to walk to reach the Main Dune Crossover which is a platform providing you with the first view of the rocky shoreline. It’s a very peaceful walk with beautiful scenery. Next, you can head to the beach to walk along the shoreline.

Mangrooves and several treee branches framing the walking path

Dune Trail

Dune Trail can be accessed right before you reach the Main Dune Crossover and runs parallel to the ocean. You can walk through the mangrove tunnels and end up further down the beach. You can turn around and head back or if you want a change of scenery, you can walk back on the beach.

Mangrove tunnel on the Dunes Trail at Blowing Rocks Preserve

Maggy’s Path and Lagoon Trail

Maggy’s Path starts at the education center on the other side of the road from the beach. It is a short path that connects to the Lagoon Trail Loop. Highlights of these trails include beautiful views of Indian River Lagoon.

Trees framing a photo of the Jupiter Inlet water

Lagoon Boardwalk

The last trail we explored was the short Lagoon Boardwalk. This trail can be accessed from the other side of the education center from Maggy’s path. The boardwalk also provides you with views of Indian River Lagoon. Additionally, the boardwalk connects to the Native Plant Garden. When we visited in January there was not a lot to see in the garden, but it might have been the time of year we visited.

Lagoon Boardwalk trail at Blowing Rocks Preserve

Hawley Education Center

There is an education center to learn more about Blowing Rocks Preserve, but unfortunately the center has been closed due to COVID19 and was not open at the time of my recent visit.

Hawley Education Center building with steps to the entrance

Final Thoughts on Blowing Rocks Preserve

Blowing Rocks Preserve held up to my expectations when I recently visited. The highlight is the beautiful beach with the limestone rocks. We also really enjoyed walking along the nature trails. I will definitely plan to visit again if I am in the area.

A picture of me in a bright pink tank top and black leggings posing by the rocks and water at Blowing Rocks Preserve

Are you looking for other things to do in South Florida? Check out these posts for ideas for your next trip.

Biscayne National Park
Everglades National Park – Shark Valley
Everglades National Park – Homestead Entrance
Gasparilla Island State Park
Myakka River State Park

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.